I Will Be Presenting At JavaOne 2011

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

After successfully presenting at JavaOne back in 2006, for some reason I have not been able to get another presentation accepted since. I chalked it up to a high level of competition. But if that is true, then the email I received yesterday raises a few questions.
Continue reading »

JavaOne 2010 – Photos

Posted in: Enterprise Java

JavaOne 2010 – Thursday Keynote

Posted in: Enterprise Java

Ah, Friday morning, the last day of JavaOne. With the customer appreciation party over and done with last night, we now get to meander through Gosling’s Toy Show, maybe some McNealy banter, hit a couple of last minute sessions and then jump on the plane home. Well, all that would be true if it wasn’t 2010 and JavaOne hadn’t become the output of the big red machine known as Oracle. So today IS the last day of JavaOne, but it is a Thursday, not a Friday and the party last night, well, I will happily be the first to admit it, was on a whole other level from anything Sun had come close to conjuring up in previous years.
Continue reading »

JavaOne 2010 – Technical General Session

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The Technical General Session on Tuesday was held at the Hilton and not at the Moscone Convention Center. After traversing the awkward combination of stairs and escalators to get to the Ballroom in the Hilton I was pleased to see the hotel staff had reconfigured the room since the lunch hour from round tables to the standard endless rows of neatly lined up chairs. The session was true to Java’s heritage and once again told as a story in 3 parts – JavaSE, JavaEE and JavaME. However, far and away the most interesting information came from the JavaSE portion of the presentation.
Continue reading »

JavaOne 2010 – Monday Keynote

Posted in: Enterprise Java

After the debacle on Sunday afternoon where all of the JavaOne conference attendees were turned back by the conference thugs at the doors to the Oracle Welcome Keynote, my expectations for Monday’s opening JavaOne Keynote were not high. The magnitude of the irony of calling the Sunday event the “Welcome” Keynote, but not allowing JavaOne attendees to watch it live makes my head spin. I have it on good authority though (I was actually allowed in because of my Press credentials), that once the JavaOne attendees had trudged back up the hill to the Hilton to “enjoy” the video feed, alcohol was found to be available and so it turned out to be one of the better Keynotes in spite of Oracle’s lack of hospitality.
Continue reading »

JavaOne 2010 – Day One Impressions

Posted in: Enterprise Java

This post could easily also be titled “Alright already Oracle, we give up, we get it, you have more money than Sun did!”. One of the striking difference to me, as someone who attended 5 JavaOnes before the Oracle buyout, is the sheer magnitude and opulence on display this year at JavaOne and even more so at OpenWorld. It makes it clear to me that Oracle’s decision to purchase Sun was a done deal before Sun even had a chance to resist.
Continue reading »

Confirmed: Google Punishes Java Developers

Posted in: Enterprise Java

So Google uses Java on their Android platform. Then Oracle buys Sun and thus acquires Java. Then Oracle sues Google for its use of Java. And who is the first victim of this sordid situation? JavaOne 2010 conference attendees.
Continue reading »

JavaOne 2010 Call For Papers

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The likelihood that we will be blessed with a JavaOne conference in 2010 just got a whole lot better.
Continue reading »

Oracle Doesn’t Mention Java – Does It Matter?

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The following image is available on the Oracle website currently (original URL):

For me personally the 2 biggest questions about the whole deal have always been What happens to MySQL? and What happens to Java?

MySQL has always been open source and Java has been creeping slowly towards open source over the last few years.

Can Oracle really kill either of these technologies if they chose too? Probably not outright, but they could certainly damage their reputation and community support. People can fork code bases and start again, but it would take time (many years) to build back up to the flagships they are today.

The above image from Oracle is interesting in that it does call out MySQL but does not mention Java at all.

Perhaps Oracle sees more value in MySQL than Java and is attempting to protect it better. Or perhaps Oracle believes Java needs less protection than MySQL, after all, much of the debate over the Oracle/Sun deal has surrounded MySQL and not Java.

Wednesday is the day when some of these questions will hopefully begin to answered.

Why do you think Oracle called out MySQL and not Java?

So Long And Thanks For All The Glassfish

Posted in: Enterprise Java

Well, it seems almost official now, Oracle will get it hands on Sun and the Java and MySQL communities (among others) will need to hold their breath and wait to see what kind of chaos this might cause for our industries.

James Gosling (the father of Java) has long been publishing Java related images on his internal Sun blog. He has now posted his very last one.

The best comment I saw so far was “So long and thanks for all the Glassfish”.

You can read the original post here.