JavaOne 2010 – Technical General Session

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The Technical General Session on Tuesday was held at the Hilton and not at the Moscone Convention Center. After traversing the awkward combination of stairs and escalators to get to the Ballroom in the Hilton I was pleased to see the hotel staff had reconfigured the room since the lunch hour from round tables to the standard endless rows of neatly lined up chairs. The session was true to Java’s heritage and once again told as a story in 3 parts – JavaSE, JavaEE and JavaME. However, far and away the most interesting information came from the JavaSE portion of the presentation.
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Engage

Posted in:

I am a full-time consultant who is available to engage with clients remotely or onsite anywhere in the world (I currently hold dual-citizenship between Australia and the United States).

To discuss your specific needs, please call me on +1.650.336.5877, or email me at craig@craigsdickson.com, or use this Contact form, or download a copy of my resume from this page.

The following is an overview of the services I provide to clients:

Software Development Process Improvement

  • Coaching for Agile process evaluation, adoption or improvement, including Scrum, Lean, Kanban and Extreme Programming (XP)
  • Definition, refinement and documentation of team processes and practices
  • Definition of Quality Assurance and Quality Control standards
  • Integration of defect tracking systems with other tools and processes
  • Engagement with customers and requirements elicitation

Software Development Team Management

  • Job Description authoring
  • Salary range and benefits package definition
  • New candidate acquisition and screening
  • Team workspace design and office space evaluation
  • Skills assessment of existing resources
  • Collaboration strategies for teams

Vendor Management

  • New vendor discovery and screening
  • Vendor proposal reviews
  • Offshore vendor management, including onsite visits and reviews
  • One throat to choke multiple vendor management

Software Configuration Management (SCM)

  • Introduction of an SCM system to teams not already using one (Subversion, Git, CVS etc)
  • Subversion and CVS training
  • Subversion and CVS server installation and configuration
  • SCM process definition and documentation, including branching and merging processes
  • SCM system migration, particularly CVS to Subversion

Build Management

  • Implementation of Apache Maven and Apache Ant based build systems
  • Automation of builds, particularly in relation to a Continuous Integration system like CruiseControl or Hudson
  • Management and versioning of produced code artifacts, particularly in relation to an Artifact Repository like Nexus or Artifactory
  • Release numbering strategies and Alpha and Beta customer release programs

Software Architecture & Design

  • Enterprise-level system architecture definition, existing architecture reviews
  • New database design and existing database design review
  • Formal UML based architecture definition

Enterprise Java Development

  • Specialist in full-stack JavaEE development
  • Public API design and documentation for ISVs
  • Web service development and integration
  • Code reviews and performance tuning
  • Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design and implementation

Web Development

  • HTML, JavaScript and CSS development
  • Integration of AJAX style JavaScript libraries including GWT, JQuery and ExtJS
  • Integration of Adobe Flash and Flex components

Automated Testing Strategies

  • Introduction of tools like JUnit and Sellenium to teams that currently do not do any automated testing
  • Integration of tests into automated build scripts and generation of metrics
  • Static analysis of codebase quality

Mobile Development

  • iPhone application design and development, specializing in integration to JavaEE based back ends
  • Web based mobile development

Social Media Strategy

  • Specializing in small to medium business that do not have dedicated in house Social Media resources
  • Evaluation of current Social Media presence
  • Recommendations for Social Media platforms based on particular business needs and goals
  • Evaluation of Location based services in relation to business needs and goals

Once again, to discuss your needs and to find out how I can help you, please contact me by phone on +1.650.336.5877, by email at craig@craigsdickson.com, or simply use this Contact form. If you would like more detailed information regarding my experience and qualifications, you can download a current copy of my professional resume from this page.

Top 10 Bare Minimum Web Client Performance Tweaks

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

In my previous article (Performance Tuning Resources For Web Clients) I discussed why you should care about the performance of your web client and then listed out some of the better places to go on the web to find information on how to go about tweaking your web clients to get that better performance. In this article I am going to dig a little deeper and call out specifically what I think are the Must-do-No-excuse-not-to-do-them-You-are-really-being-unprofessional-if-you-are-not-doing-them tweaks that you should be performing on every single one of your web development projects.
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Performance Tuning Resources For Web Clients

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

Recently I have been doing some research on tweaking websites to make them faster (either in reality, or at least in appearance to the client). Specifically the research has been focused on the actual client tier interaction – requesting the page, downloading the assets and rendering the page in the browser. In this post I will document some of the better resources I have found, focusing on client-side tweaks, so these resources should be relevant no matter if you are a Java, PHP, .Net or any other flavor of developer.
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Apple MacBook Pro Hard Drive Upgrade

Posted in: System Administration

In a previous post (Apple MacBook Pro Memory Upgrade) I detailed the reasoning behind choosing to perform some upgrades on the MacBook Pros in my family instead of buying new ones. In this post I will go over the process needed to upgrade the hard drives to give us a little more room to move for the next couple of years and hopefully some performance improvements as well.
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Apple MacBook Pro Memory Upgrade

Posted in: System Administration

When I buy a tech gadget, whether it be a cell phone or a laptop for example, it always costs me twice as much as everyone else. No matter how good a deal I try to find, it always ends up costing me exactly twice as much as everyone else. Does this happen to you?

It is caused by Geek Wife Gadget Purchasing Syndrome, wherein I cannot buy any cool technology without also getting the same thing for my wife because she also covets cool gadgets.

We had planned to update to the latest MacBook Pro this coming January, as that would mark 3 years since we purchased our current identical in every way MacBook Pros. However, in these turbulent economic times and because of the syndrome mentioned previously, we decided to explore alternatives.

In the end we decided the laptops were not too bad and we could probably squeeze another couple of years out of them, but we had to do something about hard drive space and RAM. So this post details the RAM upgrade and I will detail the hard drive upgrade in another post.
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Performance Analysis and Monitoring with Perf4j

Posted in: Enterprise Java

Are you hiring a hacker, a coder or an engineer?

Posted in: Software Development Team Leadership

There are many types of developers who work in the IT industry. When it comes time to hire a new developer it can be tough to figure out which kind of developer you are interviewing. When I do an interview I try to place the candidate in one of 3 categories – hacker, coder or engineer.

The Hacker

How to spot one:

  • Has been coding since they were 12, but have no notable credentials (no college degree, no professional certifications etc)
  • Believes all problems can be solved with some kind of “script”
  • Is unable to answer questions related to emerging industry trends
  • Appears uninterested in training opportunities
  • Their answers will be 1 or 2 words in length and no matter how much you coax them, they will not expand on them
  • Has an unhealthy fascination with the game World of Warcraft, to the point it will probably affect their performance as an employee

When to hire one:
Hiring a hacker is always a gamble for a development role. Often they make better sys admins than actual developers, since they are quite comfortable working all-nighters in dark rooms (as long as there is a supply of energy drinks and pop-tarts). They can also thrive in a QA role where automation of repeating tasks is a key skill (hackers also tend to like to break things).

When not to hire one:
A Hacker can become a rogue and distracting element in your development team. If you are looking for a team member that will have a focus on quality and meeting deadlines, a Hacker is not for you. If you want an employee that will work a regular schedule that doesn’t include them showing up at 11am looking like they have had no sleep, then a Hacker is not for you. These are the kinds of employees that you find out have been running a personal ecommerce site piggybacked on one of your corporate servers for the last 6 months.


The Coder

How to spot one:

  • Probably has a degree, but has no professional credentials (no certifications etc.)
  • Can answer common programming questions, maybe even understands Object Oriented principles, but probably struggles to answer big picture architecture questions
  • Probably cannot answer questions related to emerging industry trends
  • Doesn’t have a strong interest in getting training, attending conferences or expanding their skills in general
  • You will have to work to get them to expand on their answers beyond 1 or 2 words
  • Their references are probably positive
  • They like to play World of Warcraft at least a couple of nights a week

When to hire one:
A Coder is usually a good hire if you are simply looking to increase your development bandwidth. They will be able to contribute to a project in terms of pumping out code, but will need a solid design or requirements to follow closely. You will also need to make sure there is an Engineer close by to keep an eye on them.

When not to hire one:
If you are looking for a people leader or a technology leader, a Coder is not for you. Also don’t expect to be able to have a philosophical discussion about the state of the software industry with a Coder.


The Engineer

How to spot one:

  • Has a degree, maybe even an advanced degree, but is not a new graduate. To be an Engineer, some real world exposure is needed to shake off the bad stuff they learned in college and develop their own ideas.
  • Has a strong opinion about industry trends
  • Asks questions about training opportunities and budgets for attending industry conferences
  • Can name some tech authors they like or industry luminaries they agree with
  • Asks questions about what development processes and tools are used at your company
  • May not be able to answer every low level code or syntax question you throw at them (this is not a concern, Engineers are usually thinking at a higher level and know how to quickly find the documentation about the API they want to use if they need to)
  • Is reasonably articulate and their answers are usually more than 1 or 2 words in length
  • The interview will be much more of a conversation than an interrogation
  • Are aware of the game World of Warcraft, but don’t seem to have time to play it because of all of the tech books and journals they are trying to keep up with

When to hire one:
In general, the Engineer is the employee you are looking for. Just like in sports where you have franchise players, a good Engineer or two on your team can make or break a whole company. They are going to push the envelope in terms of the pace of development, introducing new tools, technologies and ideas and also the basic way in which the team operates. If you are working on projects that require novel solutions to be created, you will need an Engineer, as a Coder will not bring this kind of skill to the table. Also if you want to be able to increase the number of tasks you can delegate, the Engineer is for you.

When not to hire one:
Depending on the project you are working on, an Engineer can sometimes be a bit like having a sledgehammer in your hand when all you want to do is tap in a small nail. If you are working on small simple projects, or the work is generally a matter of taking a set of pre-defined requirements and pumping out a solution that requires little thought, then an Engineer may become bored quickly and you will find them moving on soon. Also expect an Engineer to have a solid idea of how things should work to be effective. Do not expect to mold an Engineer – you should be hiring them to help evolve your team, not to persuade them to the way you do things now. Additionally an Engineer will be aware of the going pay rate for someone with their skill set, so do not expect to get them cheap.


Conclusion

Not all developers are created equal. When you have an open requisition for a new developer, be aware of what kind you are truly looking for. If you need an Engineer, but only have the budget for a Coder, you need to take a hard look at what the longer term implications for your team are if you don’t have the Engineer. Once you are in the interview, make sure you have questions set up to help you quickly determine what kind of developer you are talking to. And never forget what an unusual amount of influence the World Of Warcraft will have on your hiring decisions!