CQ Development Team Server “In A Box”

Posted in: System Administration

Just wrapped up a project with the Headwire team to create an example server environment for getting up and running with a new CQ project quickly. The server has all of the elements needed for a CQ development team like Subversion, Nexus and Jenkins already installed, configured and integrated. There are also instructions for setting up your CQ environment, including deploying the CQ binaries into Nexus and making them available to your Maven builds.

The server is packaged as an Open Virtualization Archive file, so you should be able to import it into most virtualization tools (VirtualBox, VMware etc).

Check out the documentation here:

http://www.cqblueprints.com/xwiki/bin/view/Blue+Prints/CQ+Development+Team+Server+%22In+A+Box%22

What’s Next in Continuous Integration?

Posted in: Enterprise Java, Software Development Best Practices

Kohsuke Kawaguchi discusses the future of Continuous Integration and Jenkins as they will be influenced by virtualization, cloud computing, DVCS and analysis software.

via InfoQ: What’s Next in Continuous Integration?.

I Will Be Presenting At JavaOne 2011

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

After successfully presenting at JavaOne back in 2006, for some reason I have not been able to get another presentation accepted since. I chalked it up to a high level of competition. But if that is true, then the email I received yesterday raises a few questions.
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Oracle Doesn’t Mention Java – Does It Matter?

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The following image is available on the Oracle website currently (original URL):

For me personally the 2 biggest questions about the whole deal have always been What happens to MySQL? and What happens to Java?

MySQL has always been open source and Java has been creeping slowly towards open source over the last few years.

Can Oracle really kill either of these technologies if they chose too? Probably not outright, but they could certainly damage their reputation and community support. People can fork code bases and start again, but it would take time (many years) to build back up to the flagships they are today.

The above image from Oracle is interesting in that it does call out MySQL but does not mention Java at all.

Perhaps Oracle sees more value in MySQL than Java and is attempting to protect it better. Or perhaps Oracle believes Java needs less protection than MySQL, after all, much of the debate over the Oracle/Sun deal has surrounded MySQL and not Java.

Wednesday is the day when some of these questions will hopefully begin to answered.

Why do you think Oracle called out MySQL and not Java?

EU Approves $7.4 Billion Deal Between Oracle And Sun

Posted in: Enterprise Java

It’s official: the European Commission has granted regulatory approval for Oracle to acquire Sun Microsystems for approximately $7.4 billion, without further conditions. In a statement released moments ago, Oracle says it expects unconditional approval from China and Russia as well and intends to close the transaction shortly.

Robin Wauters @ TechCrunch
EU Approves $7.4 Billion Deal Between Oracle And Sun

Performance Tuning Resources For Web Clients

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

Recently I have been doing some research on tweaking websites to make them faster (either in reality, or at least in appearance to the client). Specifically the research has been focused on the actual client tier interaction – requesting the page, downloading the assets and rendering the page in the browser. In this post I will document some of the better resources I have found, focusing on client-side tweaks, so these resources should be relevant no matter if you are a Java, PHP, .Net or any other flavor of developer.
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Coding Standards – Quality From The Ground Up

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

Coding styles are THE religious debate of the Software Engineering industry. Everyone has an opinion, but no one has an iron clad argument as to why their ideas are better than someone else’s.

It doesn’t matter what language you write your code in or what company your work for or even what open source project you contribute too, the topic of coding styles will sooner or later raise its head. The debate can range from the banal, like which line the curly brace goes on, to the overly subjective, like how to name variables.

In the end most of the decision points are pretty subjective and it is somewhat irrelevant what you choose, as long as everyone agrees and you are consistent. But don’t be mistaken, a consistent coding style is an important consideration on any project, from the solo developer to the multi-national team.
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How To Test Drive Development With Linux

Posted in: System Administration

eHarmony in the Cloud

Posted in: Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing Introduction

Posted in: Cloud Computing