How I Hire Programmers

Posted in: Software Development Team Leadership

There are three questions you have when you’re hiring a programmer (or anyone, for that matter): Are they smart? Can they get stuff done? Can you work with them?

Aaron Swartz
(http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/hiring)

Multiple Online-Personality Disorder

Posted in: Personal Branding, Social Networking

With the increased hype and focus on social media and social networking, many people are struggling with trying to keep their public/private lives, or their professional/personal lives separate. And for those people, I have some bad news – there can be only one You in social media!
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Breaking The Ties That Bind

Posted in: Personal Branding

Today, KLSX a radio station in the Los Angeles area announced that they are switching formats from all talk, to some kind of Top 40 music format. Due to the sorry state of the radio market in most of the US, especially on the music oriented stations, I have been listening to KLSX pretty regularly over the last 18 months or so. So I have been listening intently today ever since the morning shift to hear each DJ’s take on the situation.

There has been one common thread through all of the shows today and that is that they have been encouraging their listeners to visit their web pages once the station goes off the air on Friday night. Adam Carolla who does the morning shift stated quite clearly that starting Monday morning his show will continue in podcast format, basically uninterrupted. Frosty, Heidi and Frank who do the midday shift were also encouraging people to visit their website, where they will post updates of whatever it is they do next.

Now, KLSX is an interesting station and may not be run like many other stations. For example it is very interesting that each show/personality on the station really has their own online presence outside of the station’s own website and were allowed to promote their own web presence openly.

It changes the model, through the use of the internet, that these DJs really were much more loosley coupled to the station they were on. This means they could easily take their show, and their listeners to a new station with only minor cosmetic station identification logo changes on their own websites. The radio station itself in this case has simply become a vehicle for the DJs to deliver their own content.

It of course is an interesting time for a radio station, who by all reports was doing well in the various timeslots, to make such a dramatic change. The satellite radio market is on the verge of collapse and if it does go under, there will be a glut of DJ personalities running back to find a safe terrestrial home.

On a personal note, I have been thinking how similar my own situation is to the way these DJs were operating. In addition to my work with The Juggernaut Group, I have a day job. I also do contracting work on the side and I help to write this blog – none of which is in any way connected to my day job. If I were to get laid off from my day job it would have very little influence on my online presence. Any good will I have generated through my online presence would continue on. Anyone who wants to do business with me would easily be able to find me via the internet, no matter where I went for my next gig.

I have essentially become much less connected to my day job. My credibility and hence ability to find another position has much more to do with my online presence than my previous employer ever will.

Are you hiring a hacker, a coder or an engineer?

Posted in: Software Development Team Leadership

There are many types of developers who work in the IT industry. When it comes time to hire a new developer it can be tough to figure out which kind of developer you are interviewing. When I do an interview I try to place the candidate in one of 3 categories – hacker, coder or engineer.

The Hacker

How to spot one:

  • Has been coding since they were 12, but have no notable credentials (no college degree, no professional certifications etc)
  • Believes all problems can be solved with some kind of “script”
  • Is unable to answer questions related to emerging industry trends
  • Appears uninterested in training opportunities
  • Their answers will be 1 or 2 words in length and no matter how much you coax them, they will not expand on them
  • Has an unhealthy fascination with the game World of Warcraft, to the point it will probably affect their performance as an employee

When to hire one:
Hiring a hacker is always a gamble for a development role. Often they make better sys admins than actual developers, since they are quite comfortable working all-nighters in dark rooms (as long as there is a supply of energy drinks and pop-tarts). They can also thrive in a QA role where automation of repeating tasks is a key skill (hackers also tend to like to break things).

When not to hire one:
A Hacker can become a rogue and distracting element in your development team. If you are looking for a team member that will have a focus on quality and meeting deadlines, a Hacker is not for you. If you want an employee that will work a regular schedule that doesn’t include them showing up at 11am looking like they have had no sleep, then a Hacker is not for you. These are the kinds of employees that you find out have been running a personal ecommerce site piggybacked on one of your corporate servers for the last 6 months.


The Coder

How to spot one:

  • Probably has a degree, but has no professional credentials (no certifications etc.)
  • Can answer common programming questions, maybe even understands Object Oriented principles, but probably struggles to answer big picture architecture questions
  • Probably cannot answer questions related to emerging industry trends
  • Doesn’t have a strong interest in getting training, attending conferences or expanding their skills in general
  • You will have to work to get them to expand on their answers beyond 1 or 2 words
  • Their references are probably positive
  • They like to play World of Warcraft at least a couple of nights a week

When to hire one:
A Coder is usually a good hire if you are simply looking to increase your development bandwidth. They will be able to contribute to a project in terms of pumping out code, but will need a solid design or requirements to follow closely. You will also need to make sure there is an Engineer close by to keep an eye on them.

When not to hire one:
If you are looking for a people leader or a technology leader, a Coder is not for you. Also don’t expect to be able to have a philosophical discussion about the state of the software industry with a Coder.


The Engineer

How to spot one:

  • Has a degree, maybe even an advanced degree, but is not a new graduate. To be an Engineer, some real world exposure is needed to shake off the bad stuff they learned in college and develop their own ideas.
  • Has a strong opinion about industry trends
  • Asks questions about training opportunities and budgets for attending industry conferences
  • Can name some tech authors they like or industry luminaries they agree with
  • Asks questions about what development processes and tools are used at your company
  • May not be able to answer every low level code or syntax question you throw at them (this is not a concern, Engineers are usually thinking at a higher level and know how to quickly find the documentation about the API they want to use if they need to)
  • Is reasonably articulate and their answers are usually more than 1 or 2 words in length
  • The interview will be much more of a conversation than an interrogation
  • Are aware of the game World of Warcraft, but don’t seem to have time to play it because of all of the tech books and journals they are trying to keep up with

When to hire one:
In general, the Engineer is the employee you are looking for. Just like in sports where you have franchise players, a good Engineer or two on your team can make or break a whole company. They are going to push the envelope in terms of the pace of development, introducing new tools, technologies and ideas and also the basic way in which the team operates. If you are working on projects that require novel solutions to be created, you will need an Engineer, as a Coder will not bring this kind of skill to the table. Also if you want to be able to increase the number of tasks you can delegate, the Engineer is for you.

When not to hire one:
Depending on the project you are working on, an Engineer can sometimes be a bit like having a sledgehammer in your hand when all you want to do is tap in a small nail. If you are working on small simple projects, or the work is generally a matter of taking a set of pre-defined requirements and pumping out a solution that requires little thought, then an Engineer may become bored quickly and you will find them moving on soon. Also expect an Engineer to have a solid idea of how things should work to be effective. Do not expect to mold an Engineer – you should be hiring them to help evolve your team, not to persuade them to the way you do things now. Additionally an Engineer will be aware of the going pay rate for someone with their skill set, so do not expect to get them cheap.


Conclusion

Not all developers are created equal. When you have an open requisition for a new developer, be aware of what kind you are truly looking for. If you need an Engineer, but only have the budget for a Coder, you need to take a hard look at what the longer term implications for your team are if you don’t have the Engineer. Once you are in the interview, make sure you have questions set up to help you quickly determine what kind of developer you are talking to. And never forget what an unusual amount of influence the World Of Warcraft will have on your hiring decisions!