Version 1.0.4 of the CQ Blueprints Maven Archetype Available

Posted in: Enterprise Java, Software Development Best Practices

I’m happy to announce the release of version 1.0.4 of the CQ Blueprints Maven Archetype.

The CQ Blueprints Maven Archetype can be used to bootstrap a fully Apache Maven enabled, multi-module, Adobe CQ project. By using the generated Apache Maven project you no longer need to use tools such as CRXDE and can instead develop and work in a tool like Eclipse and simply build and deploy to a running CQ Server using common Apache Maven commands.

This new release fixes several reported bugs, and adds complete examples of best practices for writing JSPs and custom tag libraries and integrating these with OSGI services.

Visit the CQ Blueprints site for further information about the CQ Blueprints Maven Archetype.

Remember, if you need assistance with your current or future Adobe CQ project, don’t hesitate to contact myself directly or alternatively contact Ruben Reusser and the team at Headwire who generously provide the CQ Blueprints project.

Screencast: Amazon Elastic Beanstalk Eclipse Plugin – Deploying Your Application Directly to Elastic Beanstalk

Posted in: Cloud Computing

This screencast shows how the Amazon Elastic Beanstalk plugin for Eclipse allows developers to directly deploy their Java Web Applications from within Eclipse to their Elastic Beanstalk account. The plugin allows developers to create brand new applications and configure the Elastic Beanstalk resources as part of the process.

Screencast: Amazon Elastic Beanstalk Eclipse Plugin – Testing Locally

Posted in: Cloud Computing

This screencast shows how the Amazon Elastic Beanstalk plugin for Eclipse allows developers to write Java Web Applications and test them on local instances of Apache Tomcat, just as they would when writing any traditional Java Web Application.

Screencast: Amazon Elastic Beanstalk Eclipse Plugin – Creating Your First Application

Posted in: Cloud Computing

This screencast shows how to install the Amazon Elastic Beanstalk plugin into your Eclipse environment and how to create your first Elastic Beanstalk application.

Java PaaS Vendor Survey – September 2011 (YouTube)

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

Remote Debugging Elastic Beanstalk with the AWS Toolkit for Eclipse

Posted in: Cloud Computing

Learn to use the AWS Toolkit for Eclipse to easily configure Elastic Beanstalk for remote debugging.

Good riddance Lotus Notes

Posted in: System Administration

As of today I no longer need to have Lotus Notes installed on my Macbook Pro! Woo hoo!

I was very excited at the prospect of uninstalling it (yes, uninstalling bad software is all it takes to get me excited). Lotus Notes is far and away the largest installation on my laptop. It weighs in at an incredible 792 MB! The next largest application I have installed is iPhoto at 430 MB and then follows Gimp at 263 MB. There would be very few people that would argue that Lotus Notes provides more functionality per megabyte than Gimp does. In my experience IBM is especially good at producing bloatware, but even this is beyond any rational (pun intended) explanation.

What makes it worse is that Lotus Notes is a just plain awful tool to use. So its a one-two punch, first it takes up ridiculously unjustified amounts of disk space, then it rubs salt in that wound by just being horrible to use. Nothing has ever made me long for Microsoft Outlook like Lotus Notes does, and that is saying something since I am a self-confessed Apple fan-boy.

I am pretty sure my laptop sighed in relief when I deleted Lotus Notes, like a giant burden had been lifted from its shoulders.

The only upside to Lotus Notes, is that it does have an Apple version at all, although this is more due to the fact that the recent versions are based on Eclipse (ie. Java), not so much that IBM really loves Apple users in any way.

Farewell Lotus Notes, it was depressing and frustrating to know you, and I hope we never cross paths again.