JavaOne 2011 – Monday Keynote

Posted in: Enterprise Java

JavaOne 2011 got off to a bit of a shaky start this morning with there being a lack of seating in the Grand Ballroom of the Hilton, leading to the escalators eventually being blocked by physically meek, yet surly, security guards and having people being redirected to smaller rooms somewhere else in the rabbit warren that is the Hilton’s conference and event space. However that didn’t happen until after a couple hundred poor souls were left standing at the back of the room to endure a 2 hour-long dry and technical keynote.

Then Mark Reinhold went missing. Not sure what happened there but awkwardly is name was announced and someone else took the stage with no real explanation about why. He then went on to introduce Doug Fisher, VP Intel, who was supposed to be the 2nd half of the keynote. The Intel guys and their Oracle counterparts presented myriad of numbers and graphs to prove that Java runs well on the Intel architecture. Not really sure anyone needed a lot of convincing of that, but their results were impressive nonetheless.

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JavaOne 2010 – Monday Keynote

Posted in: Enterprise Java

After the debacle on Sunday afternoon where all of the JavaOne conference attendees were turned back by the conference thugs at the doors to the Oracle Welcome Keynote, my expectations for Monday’s opening JavaOne Keynote were not high. The magnitude of the irony of calling the Sunday event the “Welcome” Keynote, but not allowing JavaOne attendees to watch it live makes my head spin. I have it on good authority though (I was actually allowed in because of my Press credentials), that once the JavaOne attendees had trudged back up the hill to the Hilton to “enjoy” the video feed, alcohol was found to be available and so it turned out to be one of the better Keynotes in spite of Oracle’s lack of hospitality.
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Confirmed: Google Punishes Java Developers

Posted in: Enterprise Java

So Google uses Java on their Android platform. Then Oracle buys Sun and thus acquires Java. Then Oracle sues Google for its use of Java. And who is the first victim of this sordid situation? JavaOne 2010 conference attendees.
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Why Automated Testing is Important – Part 2

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

In Part 1 of this series I described the characteristics that make up a good Automated Test. Here in Part 2 of this series I will explore all of the benefits you will enjoy by creating those good tests and why the time spent on making good tests is a no-brainer investment.
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Why Automated Testing is Important – Part 1

Posted in: Software Development Best Practices

The adoption of Automated Testing strategies and tools, both in Agile and traditional teams, has been patchy – some teams and communities have embraced it, but many organizations still perceive it as a burden that just slows down development. Those that see the writing and execution of tests as an additional, costly and separate task from development have missed seeing some of the main benefits of an expertly manicured test suite.
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JavaOne 2010 Call For Papers

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The likelihood that we will be blessed with a JavaOne conference in 2010 just got a whole lot better.
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Oracle Doesn’t Mention Java – Does It Matter?

Posted in: Enterprise Java

The following image is available on the Oracle website currently (original URL):

For me personally the 2 biggest questions about the whole deal have always been What happens to MySQL? and What happens to Java?

MySQL has always been open source and Java has been creeping slowly towards open source over the last few years.

Can Oracle really kill either of these technologies if they chose too? Probably not outright, but they could certainly damage their reputation and community support. People can fork code bases and start again, but it would take time (many years) to build back up to the flagships they are today.

The above image from Oracle is interesting in that it does call out MySQL but does not mention Java at all.

Perhaps Oracle sees more value in MySQL than Java and is attempting to protect it better. Or perhaps Oracle believes Java needs less protection than MySQL, after all, much of the debate over the Oracle/Sun deal has surrounded MySQL and not Java.

Wednesday is the day when some of these questions will hopefully begin to answered.

Why do you think Oracle called out MySQL and not Java?