New High-Performance Provisioned IOPS Storage for Amazon RDS

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

Today AWS announced that it is extending the provisioned IOPS concept already available for EBS volumes to RDS instances. So just like with EBS volumes you can now not only provision the storage size associated with an RDS instance, but also the performance of the RDS instance. This is a great improvement for AWS customers who want to run high-performance applications on RDS as they can now pay for the performance they need.

Remember that RDS is a very easy service to leverage from enterprise Java applications because the databases can be made available through a standard JDBC interface. This means that there is absolutely no difference in terms of the Java code when using an RDS hosted MySQL instance, versus a MySQL instance hosted on your own in-house server, or even hosted on an EC2 instance for example.

Here is the official announcement:

We are excited to announce the availability of Amazon RDS Provisioned IOPS, a new high-performance storage option for the Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS). Amazon RDS makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale a MySQL, Oracle, or SQL Server database in the cloud — and now enables you to provision up to 10,000 IOPS (input/output operations per second) with 1TB of storage for your new database instances.

Amazon RDS Provisioned IOPS is optimized for I/O-intensive, transactional (OLTP) database workloads. We are delivering this functionality to you in two stages. Starting immediately, when you create new database instances using the AWS Management Console or the Amazon RDS APIs, you can provision from 1,000 IOPS to 10,000 IOPS with corresponding storage from 100GB to 1TB for MySQL and Oracle databases. If you are using SQL Server then the maximum IOPS you can provision is 7,000 IOPS.

In the near future, we plan to provide you with an automated way to migrate existing database instances to Provisioned IOPS storage for the MySQL and Oracle database engines. If you want to migrate an existing RDS database instance to Provisioned IOPS storage immediately, you can export the data from your existing database instance and import into a new database instance equipped with Provisioned IOPS storage.

Amazon RDS Provisioned IOPS can be used with all RDS features like Multi-AZ, Read Replicas, and Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), and with all RDS-supported database engines (MySQL, Oracle, and SQL Server). Amazon RDS Provisioned IOPS is immediately available for new database instances in the US East (N. Virginia), US West (N. California), and EU West (Ireland) Regions. We plan to launch in our other AWS Regions in the coming months.

Last Chance To Sign Up for Online Amazon Web Services for Java Developers Course

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

This is your last chance to sign up for the Amazon Web Services for Java Developers course that I will be teaching for the University of California, Irvine starting next Monday. The class is 100% online and open to everyone, anywhere in the world. The class runs for 10 weeks and is delivered asynchronously, meaning you can complete the tasks each week when it suits you during that week.

This week is Orientation Week (a chance to test your login information) and the real material begins next Monday the 2nd of July. So this really is your last chance to enroll!

If you want to find out a little more about the class before signing up, you can watch this recorded webinar that goes over everything you need to know.

All that you need to participate is an internet connection, an interest in Java development and a desire to take your code to the next level by deploying it on the most dominant cloud solution out there now, Amazon Web Services.

Ready to enroll? Perfect! Enrollment is 100% online and can be done via this University of California website.

Amazon Announces First Data Center in Australia

Posted in: Cloud Computing

The speed of the backbone between Australia and the US can sometimes make you wonder if there are not just two guys on either end of a tin can phone screaming one one zero one zero endlessly to each other back and forth. So the news from Amazon today is a welcome upgrade to the global AWS infrastructure.

In a short blog post on the Amazon Web Services Blog today, Jeff Barr announced that Amazon is adding an edge location in Sydney, Australia. The location will initially only host CloudFront (CDN) and Route 53 (DNS) resources. However, those two services alone will help AWS customers based in Australia and serving content to their own Australian customers to improve their response times greatly.

Prior to this announcement, AWS customers who wanted to deliver content to Australian based customers were delivering it from offshore locations like the US and Singapore. Having CloudFront resources hosted “locally” in Sydney delivering all that static content (including streaming media) to Australian based consumers will result in a much more pleasurable end-user experience.

The Route 53 addition also means that those AWS customers who host their DNS data with AWS will now also experience quicker DNS response times which will also improve the end-user experience by lowering overall in-browser response times.

With the appointment of Joe Ziegler as the AWS Evangelist for Australia and New Zealand recently, and now this new edge location announcement, Australian based AWS customers should be feeling reassured in their AWS investments.

UCI Webinar – Amazon Web Services for Developers (YouTube)

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

Amazon Web Services for Java Developers – JavaOne Presentation Accepted

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java

I received notification this week that my submission for this year’s JavaOne conference in San Francisco was accepted. The presentation will feed out of the UCI course that will be completed by then. It will be a 1 hour bootcamp for Java developers who are interested in starting to use Amazon Web Services. The presentation will not only cover how to host applications on AWS, but how to also make use of AWS during the implementation and test stages of development.  It will also encourage developers to rearchitect their applications to leverage AWS services to their greatest potential.

Here is the official abstract that was accepted:

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is an ideal platform to develop on and to use for hosting enterprise Java applications. The zero up-front costs and virtually infinite scalability of resources enable Java EE developers to start small and be confident that their infrastructure will grow with their application. In addition, the nature of AWS and the services available help solve some of the problems Java developers often face in more-traditional environments. In this session, you will be introduced to AWS concepts, gain an understanding of how existing Java EE applications can be migrated to the AWS environment, what advantages there are in doing that, and how to architect a new Java EE application from the ground up to leverage the AWS environment for maximum benefit.

The dates for the conference in 2012 are September 30th through October 4th.

A big thanks to the AWS in Education team!

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Customer Service, Enterprise Java

My new course at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) begins in late July and there is an informational Webinar tomorrow (June 7th) for those that are interested in finding out more. Details of the webinar and the class can be found here:

http://unex.uci.edu/pressroom/releases/pr.aspx?id=323

But now to the point of this post. I was just notified that the AWS in Education team has stepped up to the plate in a big way and has provided an “AWS in Education grant award” to help the students in the class cover some (possibly all) of the costs of using the AWS services while they are taking the class and carrying out the various assignments and completing the class project. This is a huge deal to the students who will already be paying for the class itself, now they will not need to worry about the costs of using Amazon’s services and can concentrate on learning instead.

Thank you to everyone in the AWS in Education team!

You can find out more about the AWS in Education team here:

http://aws.amazon.com/education/

Remember, the UCI course is 100% online and open to anyone, anywhere on the planet!

Free Webinar – Amazon Web Services for Java Developers

Posted in: Cloud Computing, Enterprise Java, Software Development Best Practices, System Administration

I will be giving a free 1-hour Webinar this coming Thursday (June 7th) to introduce a brand new course that I will be teaching at the University of California in the Summer quarter. The new course is entitled Amazon Web Services for Java Developers and is a 10 week, 100% online course that will cover all of the critical topics that a Java Architect and/or Developer needs to know to make the most of Amazon Web Services in their applications.

To register for the Webinar please visit the University of California website.

Further details on the class and information on how to enroll can be found here.

Cloud is a corporate strategy, not a tactical solution

Posted in: Cloud Computing

Many of us are looking at the adoption of cloud as just another technology, and are leaving the decisions on how to adopt, own, and manage the cloud up to engineers. But acquiring a cloud management platform is not an engineering decision — it’s a strategic one. Do engineers need to be involved? Yes, but your cloud adoption strategy has already failed if you don’t treat cloud as the operational construct that it is.

via Cloud is a corporate strategy, not a tactical solution — Cloud Computing News.

Amazon Web Services Blog: Save The Date! AWS re: Invent – Global Customer and Partner Conference

Posted in: Cloud Computing

Block off November 27-29 on your calendar, book a flight to Las Vegas, and plan to spend three days at AWS re: Invent learning more about AWS from AWS engineers, architects, partners, and customers in over 100 sessions.

via Amazon Web Services Blog: Save The Date! AWS re: Invent – Global Customer and Partner Conference.

Amazon Announces AWS Storage Gateway

Posted in: Cloud Computing

Today in an email to existing AWS customers, Amazon introduced a service known as AWS Storage Gateway which is an on-premise software appliance allowing customers to easily transfer data from on-premise storage to S3. This service could be used for offsite backup and capacity augmentation among other use cases.

From the email:

We’re excited to introduce the AWS Storage Gateway, a service that provides a new option to securely upload data to the AWS cloud for scalable, reliable, cost-effective storage.

The AWS Storage Gateway connects an on-premises software appliance with cloud-based storage for seamless integration between on-premises IT environments and AWS storage. The service supports a standard iSCSI interface, enabling you to take advantage of cloud based storage without re-architecting existing applications. The AWS Storage Gateway provides low-latency performance by maintaining data in your on-premises storage hardware while asynchronously uploading data over SSL to AWS, where it is encrypted and securely stored in the Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).

The AWS Storage Gateway enables you to securely upload your data to the AWS cloud for cost-effective backup, storing point-in-time snapshots of your on-premises application data in Amazon S3 for future recovery. Your data in Amazon S3 is stored as Amazon EBS snapshots, which you can restore on-premises using the AWS Management Console.

The AWS Storage Gateway also makes it easy to leverage the on-demand capacity of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) for additional capacity during peak periods, as a more cost-effective way to run normal enterprise workloads, or for disaster recovery purposes. You can create Amazon EBS volumes from the snapshots you’ve taken using the AWS Storage Gateway, and attach these volumes to your Amazon EC2 compute instances. Once attached, your Amazon EC2 instances will have access to this data to do any processing or computation.

Pricing for the AWS Storage Gateway is $125/month per activated gateway and comes with a 60 day free trial. Snapshot storage pricing starts at only $0.14 per gigabyte per month.

Here is a video that describes Storage Gateway in more detail.